• This category of resources helps you understand the process of planning your pole vault training.  The pole vault is a very demanding sport requiring speed, strength and agility beyond what's required for many other sports.  As a result, there is a wide variety of training that goes into an overall training plan.  These resrouces will help you understand the various multi-faceted aspects of vault training and provide ideas on how to draw-up your training plans to fit in your schedule and maximize reults.
  • These links provide information on quick reference summaries of various pole vaulting aspects, coaching hints, and technique guidelines.  These resources are not a substitute for experienced coaching, but can be useful quick reference resources.
  • This category of links provides references to warm-up drill. Some of these drills are general warm-up routines for sprinting sports, and some are maybe more specific to the pole vault.  Prior to attending any Fuzion pole vault training session, its always a good idea to review these warm-up routines.  These drills are number tagged just like college courses, i.e. 100, 200, 300 400, where the 100 level routines are relatively simple and require no equipment, the 200 level routines are more advanced and may require minimal equipment, and the 300 and 400 routines are more advanced yet.
  • This category of links covers a wide variety of fitness and strength training resources.  The links are number tagged just like college courses, i.e. 100, 200, 300 400, where the 100 level routines are relatively simple and require no equipment, the 200 level routines are more advanced and may require minimal equipment, and the 300 and 400 routines are more advanced yet.
  • Included in the category are a variety of gymnastics drills.  These drills help vaulters with varous agility skills that are used in the pole vault.  These drills are number tagged just like college courses, i.e. 100, 200, 300 400, where the 100 level drill are relatively simple and require no equipment, the 200 level drills are more advanced and may require minimal equipment, and the 300 and 400 drills are more advanced yet.
  • The drills in this category are focused on the runway and sprinting.  The approach is a very important part of the pole vault. Fundamentally, the energy built-up on the runway is transfered into the pole where that energy is then harnessed to catapult the vaulter over the bar.  So the speed and posture of the vaulter is very important during the approach. These drills are number tagged just like college courses, i.e. 100, 200, 300 400, where the 100 level routines are relatively simple and require no equipment, the 200 level routines are more advanced and may require minimal equipment, and the 300 and 400 routines are more advanced yet.
  • This category of drills focuses specifically on the plant and take-off, which is crucial for the efficient transfer of the vaulters energy off the runway and into the pole.  These drills focus on various aspects of strength, speed, and posture for the plant and take-off.  These drills are number tagged just like college courses, i.e. 100, 200, 300 400, where the 100 level routines are relatively simple and require no equipment, the 200 level routines are more advanced and may require minimal equipment, and the 300 and 400 routines are more advanced yet.
  • This category of links provides information on the throw and swing phase of the pole vault. The objective of this phase of the vault is to continue to transfer energy into the vault and build momentum into rock back position.  Like the other technique categories, these drills are number tagged just like college courses, i.e. 100, 200, 300 400, where the 100 level routines are relatively simple and require no equipment, the 200 level routines are more advanced and may require minimal equipment, and the 300 and 400 routines are more advanced yet.
  • This category of links focuses on the rock back phase of the vault with the objective to achieve inverted position with center of mass shifting above the head and positioning the body to catch the recoil of the pole. These drills are number tagged just like college courses, i.e. 100, 200, 300 400, where the 100 level routines are relatively simple and require no equipment, the 200 level routines are more advanced and may require minimal equipment, and the 300 and 400 routines are more advanced yet.
  • This category of links focuses on the top-end phase of the vault, the extend, turn and push-off.  The objective of this phase of the vault is to extend the body up the pole in concert with the recoil, turning belly to the bar and increase height with push-off.  These drills are number tagged just like college courses, i.e. 100, 200, 300 400, where the 100 level routines are relatively simple and require no equipment, the 200 level routines are more advanced and may require minimal equipment, and the 300 and 400 routines are more advanced yet.
  • This category of links provides inforamtion on injury prevention and treatment.  Injury prevention is important in any sporting event, but can be more difficult with the pole vault given the wide variety of training that's required. When injuries do occur, it's important to pursue proper treatment to prevent reinjury and enable a quick return to normal training.
  • This category of links will provide information on the college recruiting process, for athletes that want to continue their pole vaulting beyond high school. 
  • Included in this category are some links to inforamtion on what makes a good youth sports parent.  Parents often don't realize it, but their behavior can have a significant and long-lasting impression on their youth athletes.  Finding the right balance between being unengaged, involved and overly-engaged can sometime be difficult.  These links are designed to provide perspectives that can help parents achieve the right balance for their athlete.